Ontario: the codification of the discovery rule is not semantics (blog pedantry)

The decision in Loy-English v. Fournier requires some gentle criticism for its description of the limitations scheme:

[40]           Before turning to the evidence, I will just mention that counsel for the intervenor provided me with a useful review and critique of much recent jurisprudence. I have not found it necessary to address the argument that there is a difference between the time when a cause of action accrues at common law and the day when a claim is discovered under the Act.  I need not seek to resolve what counsel identifies as inconsistency in the jurisprudence and failure of courts to recognize the extent to which the Act has changed the common law.

[41]           I will just observe that in the seminal decision of Peixiero v. Haberman, the Supreme Court of Canada endorsing the principle of discoverability in connection with Ontario’s motor vehicle regime uses language suggesting a cause of action under Ontario law only “accrues” when it is possible to determine that the injuries exceed the threshold.[18]  In Lawless v. Anderson our Court of Appeal declared that “the principle of discoverability provides that a cause of action arises for the purposes of a limitation period when the material facts on which it is based have been discovered, or ought to have been discovered, by the plaintiff by the exercise of reasonable diligence.” The court went on to define “cause of action” as “the fact or facts which give a person a right to judicial redress or relief against another.”[19]  Arguably, the effect of the Act is to identify discoverability as a constituent component of a cause of action in Ontario but this is largely a question of semantics.

[42]           The important point is the rationale underlying the discoverability principle. A limitation statute should not be construed to run before the plaintiff could reasonably know that she had a viable cause of action.  It is this rationale that is codified in s. 5 of the Act.  Whether the cause of action can be said to have arisen at an earlier date, knowledge that there is a cause of action and a legal proceeding is an appropriate avenue for relief is a component of discoverability.  All four statutory components are necessary to trigger the running of the limitation period.

  1. It’s not arguable that the Limitations Act makes discoverability a constituent element of a cause of action, nor is the argument one of semantics.  At common law, the discoverability rule relates to the accrual of a cause of action, not the elements of a cause of action.  The rule provides that a cause of action accrues when the plaintiff discovers its material elements.  Section 5 of Limitations Act contains a codified discoverability rule that applies to “claims”, a defined term, not causes of action.  It also doesn’t make discoverability an element of a cause of action or “claim”, but determinative of when discovery occurs.  This isn’t at all an issue of semantics.  “Claims” and causes of action are not interchangeable, a point made recently by the Court of Appeal.
  2. It is not so that the Limitations Act prevents time from running before a plaintiff can reasonably know that she has a viable cause of action.  Knowledge of the elements of a cause of action will not result in discovery of a “claim” under the Limitations Act.  This is because the s. 5(1)(a)(iv) discovery matter—the appropriateness of a proceeding as a remedy—is not an element of any cause of action, and also because discovery requires knowledge of damage, and damage is not an element of any cause of action based on conduct that is actionable per se (like breach of contract).

Ontario: another good “abilities and circumstances” analysis

 

The decision in Service Mold + Aerospace Inc. v. Khalaf is another good example of the court’s assessment of a plaintiff’s abilities and circumstances for a limitations analysis.  The fact that the plaintiff had no background or education in bookkeeping, accounting, or finances informed the court’s analysis of when the plaintiff could reasonably discover a fraud committed by his bookkeeper.

It’s also a noteworthy decision for the dubious (and unsuccessful) position taken by the defendant:

[21]           TD Bank acknowledges that the plaintiffs did not actually discover the fraud until early 2015 and relies on s. 5(1)(b).  The position of TD Bank is as follows:

1.         The plaintiffs ought to have discovered the claim at least by 2009 or 2010.  TD Bank takes the position that bookkeeper fraud is a well-known risk and a prudent businessman would have measures in place to control it.  Mr. Schuurman, in effect, turned a blind eye to the risk. TD Bank therefore invites me to dismiss the action.

To discover a claim, the plaintiff must know that the defendant has caused or contributed to his loss (and there is no “claim” as defined by the Limitations Act until loss occurs).  Whether the plaintiff was blind or not to a risk that ultimately resulted in his loss, until the loss occurred, the claim was not discoverable.  This position might support a contributory negligence argument, but it’s immaterial to a limitations defence.

Ontario: a good “abilities and circumstances” s. 5(1)(b) analysis

Lewis v. Plaskos is noteworthy for its findings regarding the plaintiff’s abilities and circumstances for the purposes of a discovery analysis.  The court doesn’t often make these findings explicitly (though it should).

The court found that plaintiff had the abilities of her experienced medical malpractice lawyer, and a reasonable experienced medical malpractice would be alert to the possibility that physician’s notes are incomplete.  It was accordingly unreasonable for the plaintiff, through her lawyer, not to consider the possibility and make the accordant inquiries:

[49]           The focus of the dispute is on sub-section 5(1)(b), Limitations Act, 2002.  In particular, the issue is whether the analysis of hospital records by Ms. McCartney has met the test of being objectively reasonable.

[50]           After the firm was retained by the plaintiffs, Ms. McCartney was assigned the task of reviewing the hospital records.  In that process, she was looking to see what was or was not done and why.  Ms. Cartney was considering who was responsible.  She knew this was a case of potential delayed diagnosis.  Those responsible were to be named as defendants in the statement of claim.

[51]           There are three preliminary matters that are of concern, namely delay, the state of the hospital records and the lack of notes by Ms. McCartney.

[52]           The hospital records were received by Ms. McCartney on or about October 14, 2011.  Thirteen months later, in November 2012, the review of those records commenced.  While Ms. McCartney was on a working maternity leave during part of that period of time, presumably meaning part-time attendance at the office and with responsibility for other files as well, the review process should have commenced much earlier.  Mr. Michael also had carriage of the file.  Other junior lawyers in the firm could have been asked to assist.

[53]           There is always a danger in waiting until the presumptive limitation period is about to expire.  The process can become rushed.  Due diligence was not met.

[54]           It is now known that Dr. Cameron failed to fully record her involvement with Ms. Lewis, particularly her consultation with Dr. Plaskos.

[55]           Litigation lawyers, particularly those involved in personal injury and medical malpractice cases, routinely review physician’s notes and hospital records.  These lawyers are aware of the dangers in conducting such review regarding illegible handwriting, abbreviated terms and incomplete recording.  The failure of physicians to fully record matters pertaining to a patient is often a topic in the litigation process, including at trial.  In the absence of records, physicians often have difficulty recalling specific events and discussions.

[56]           In my view, Ms. McCartney and Mr. Michael, both experienced medical malpractice lawyers, would have, or should have, been alert to the possibility the physician’s notes were incomplete.

[57]           The only contemporaneous note made by Ms. McCartney during her review and analysis of the hospital records was the summary previously mentioned.  The summary is incomplete, making no mention of her conclusions as now presented on this motion and lacking detail as to the analytical process undertaken.  Hence, on cross-examination, Ms. McCartney was unable to recall her state of mind when reviewing the records and the details of her thought process.  Like physicians, lawyers need to record all details of their involvement for future use.

[58]           The first step in the review process is to determine what was recorded.  When part of the record contains handwritten notes, the lawyer looks to see if such are legible.  There was a legitimate concern with Dr. Cameron’s handwriting and use of abbreviated terms.  Ms. McCartney and Mr. Michael, for example, looked at a key word and correctly concluded it to be “refused”.  “Radiol” was considered to be radiologist or radiology department.  When there is any concern as to what was written, it requires inquiry of the record keeper.

[59]           There are two conclusions Ms. McCartney made that are of critical importance.  First, she considered the phrase “will discuss with radiologist or radiology department re:  imaging” as connected to the preceding note “will check post void residual”.  Second, Ms. McCartney determined “MRI refused as normal rectal tone and no bilateral leg weakness” as Dr. Cameron declining to order an MRI.  Such are possible interpretations or conclusions but there are others that, in my view, are far more reasonable.

[60]           Just as physicians arrive at a “differential diagnosis” following examination of a patient, so too must a lawyer consider all reasonable options in their analysis of a case.

[61]           Connecting “will discuss with radiologist or radiology department re:  imaging” to “post void residual” is too restrictive.  The more reasonable interpretation is that Dr. Cameron was going to seek assistance in determining what further imaging tests were required.  At this point, Dr. Cameron was aware the lumbar x-ray, as interpreted by Dr. Plaskos, was inconclusive having regard to the nature of Ms. Lewis’ complaints.

[62]           Dr. Cameron’s note is all recorded under the time of 18:00 hours.  Ms. McCartney incorrectly assumed this represented one event.  But there are gaps in the recording and, having regards to the words used, it is more likely the record should have been seen as several separate recordings.

[63]           In this regard, the words “MRI refused” invites the question “by whom”.  Ms. McCartney’s conclusion that Dr. Cameron refused her own request is not reasonable.  It is contrary to normal use of English language and, as it follows the note “will discuss with radiologist …” with a gap in between, leads to the inference someone else is involved.  At a minimum, there are a number of possible interpretations and each must be pursued.  Indeed, Ms. McCartney acknowledged in cross-examination that one possible interpretation was that the MRI had been refused by someone else, but such a possibility did not occur to her at the time of her review.  It should have.

[64]           The failure to order an MRI in a timely fashion is central to the plaintiffs’ case.  Ms. McCartney knew that Dr. Plaskos was involved in interpreting an x-ray of Ms. Lewis on January 2, 2011, as had been requested by Dr. Reesor.  Ms. McCartney also knew that emergency department physicians will sometimes consult a radiologist as to what imaging to order or for an urgent MRI.  These factors, and others previously addressed, meant Ms. McCartney had to consider all reasonable scenarios.  Instead, she arrived at a conclusion without examining reasonable alternatives.  Her analysis, in result, was incomplete.

[65]           I conclude the analysis of hospital records by Ms. McCartney was not objectively reasonable, particularly having regard to her abilities and experience as a medical malpractice lawyer.

[66]           The cause of action occurred on January 2, 2011.  The limitation issue is with discoverability and so the presumptive limitation date of January 2, 2013 does not apply.

[67]           The statement of claim was issued on October 7, 2014.  Was it discoverable prior to October 7, 2012?  I conclude it was.  The medical records were received in October 2011.  A diligent review would have led to further inquiry.  The potential claim against Dr. Plaskos, in my view, was discoverable by December 31, 2011 and certainly long before October 7, 2012.

[68]           In result, I conclude the limitation period had expired prior to the statement of claim being issued.  The claim against Dr. Plaskos is statute-barred by operation of Section 5Limitations Act, 2002.  The claim against him must be dismissed.  I so order.

 

Ontario: Court of Appeal says that the Limitations Act applies to claims, not causes of action

Justice Strathy’s decision in Apotex Inc. v. Nordion (Canada) Inc. is one of the most important limitations decisions from the Court of Appeal since the Limitations Act came into force.  It’s the first decision to make explicit that the Limitations Act doesn’t apply to causes of action, but to “claims” (as defined in s. 1 of the Limitations Act).

This distinction is most often missed by Ontario courts., which generally treat the cause of action and the “claim” as interchangeable for limitations purposes.  I have written about this issue extensively (see this, for example), including the problems that result.

Justice Strathy noted one of those problems.  Because damage is always an element of the “claim” but not of any cause of action based on conduct that is actionable per se, they accrue differently.  A breach of contract is the most common example:

[84]   Before the reform of limitations law brought about by the LA 2002, the previous statute, the Limitations ActR.S.O. 1990, c. L.15, looked to when the cause of action arose (an expression not used in the LA 2002) to determine the commencement of the limitation period. The “cause of action” for breach of contract accrued on the date of the breach and the limitation period began to run on that date: see Graeme Mew, Debra Rolph & Daniel Zacks, The Law of Limitations, 3d ed. (Toronto: LexisNexis, 2016) at §9.6; Robert Simpson Co. Ltd. et al v. Foundation Co. of Canada Ltd. et al (1982), 1982 CanLII 1750 (ON CA)36 O.R. (2d) 97 (C.A.), at p. 105Schwebel v. Telekes1967 CanLII 163 (ON CA)[1967] 1 O.R. 541 (C.A.), at p. 544.

[85]   This was the case whether or not damages had yet been incurred. Damages are not an essential element of the cause of action for breach of contract: Mars Canada Inc. v. Bemco Cash & Carry Inc.2018 ONCA 239 (CanLII)140 O.R. (3d) 81, at para. 32.

[86]   Under the LA 2002, the limitation period for breach of contract does not necessarily run from the date of the breach. As I have observed, in contrast to the former statute, the date of the “act or omission” – the breach of contract itself – is not the only factor to be considered in determining when a claim is discovered under the LA 2002. Instead, the date on which the plaintiff knew of the occurrence of the act or omission is only one factor to be determined. In addition to that factor, the person with the claim must also know that the “injury, loss or damage had occurred” (s. 5(1)(a)(i)), that it was caused or contributed to by the act or omission (the breach of contract) (s. 5(i)(a)(ii)), and that the act or omission was that of the defendant (s. 5(1)(a)(iii)).

[87]   As a result of the presumption under s. 5(2), the limitation period begins to run on the date of the breach (being the date of the “act or omission”), unless it is proven that the person with the claim did not know of one or more of the matters set out in s. 5(1)(a), and that a reasonable person would not have known of those matters.

[88]   A plaintiff with a claim for breach of contract may displace the presumption in s. 5(2) if, for example, they establish that they did not know that “the injury, loss or damage” had occurred or, if it had occurred, they did not know that it was caused by an act or omission of the defendant – the breach of contract. But it is well-settled that the person need not know the extent of the injury, loss or damage to trigger the commencement of the limitation period. It is enough that they know that some damage has occurred. In Hamilton (City) v. Metcalfe & Mansfield Capital Corp.2012 ONCA 156 (CanLII)290 O.A.C. 42, at paras. 59-61, this court adopted the common law rule expressed in Peixeiro v. Haberman1997 CanLII 325 (SCC)[1997] 3 S.C.R. 549, at para. 18, that “some damage” is sufficient to start the running of the limitation period.

Justice Strathy set out the impact this has on a limitations analysis for a breach of contract: 91-92

[91]   First, to determine when a claim is discovered in a breach of contract case, it is necessary to examine the terms of the contract and the nature of the alleged breach (the “act or omission”) on which the claim is based: see Mew, Rolph & Zacks, at §9.5, citing to NFC Acquisition L.P. v. Centennial 2000 Inc., 2010 ONSC 733, 67 B.L.R. 218, at paras. 29-30, affirmed in 2011 ONCA 43 (CanLII)78 B.L.R. (4th) 11Hopkins v. Stockman2013 SKCA 118 (CanLII)427 Sask. R. 4, at para. 10. As van Rensburg J.A. noted in Morrison v. Barzo, at paras. 33, 49, the application of the test in s. 5(1)(a) requires the identification or definition of the claims at issue. This is a necessary starting point.

[92]   Second, in many cases, the act or omission, causation, and the injury, loss or damage will occur simultaneously, and will be discovered simultaneously. But this will not always be the case. In some cases, discovery of the “act or omission” will not start the limitation period running unless injury, loss or damage has occurred and has been discovered (s. 5(1)(a)(i)).

To understand the significance of this decision, compare it to the Court’s description of discovery in Lawless:

[22]         The principle of discoverability provides that “a cause of action arises for the purposes of a limitation period when the material facts on which it is based have been discovered, or ought to have been discovered, by the plaintiff by the exercise of reasonable diligence.  This principle conforms with the generally accepted definition of the term ‘cause of action’ – the fact or facts which give a person a right to judicial redress or relief against another”:Aguonie v. Galion Solid Waste Material Inc. (1998), 1998 CanLII 954 (ON CA), 38 O.R. (3d) 161 (C.A.), at p. 170.

Here the Court describes discovery in terms of knowledge of the material facts of the cause of action, which is a statement of common law discovery, not discovery as codified in s. 5 of the Limitations Act.  Apotex, together with recent decision in Gillham, suggests that the Court is moving away from the misconception that underlies reliance on Lawless.   

Two other points:

  1. Justice Strathy’s decision begins with s. 2 of the Limitations Act.  Because this is the provision that determines the application of the Limitations Act, this is the correct starting point for any limitations analysis.  However, you rarely see courts considering it.
  2. It would have been helpful for the Court to include a paragraph explaining why the cause of action does not feature in the Limitations Act.  It was a deliberate decision.  The Legislature sought to resolve the enormous problems inherent in cause of action accrual by converting all causes of action into one unit, the claim.  This also allowed for universal limitation periods, rather than limitation periods for different categories of causes of action.

 

Ontario: Court of Appeal says death is not a “condition”

In Lee v. Ponte, the Court of Appeal held that death does not trigger the application s. 7 of the Limitations Act.

Section 7 suspends the limitation period when the claimant “is incapable of commencing a proceeding in respect of the claim because of his or her physical, mental or psychological condition”.  The appellant in Lee argued that this provision could extend the limitation period for an estate trustee to bring a claim that the deceased person had before death:

[5]         The appellant urges that s. 7 should be interpreted to apply when the person having the claim dies before commencing proceedings. He argues that a deceased person is incapable of commencing a proceeding in respect of the claim because of his or her physical, mental or psychological condition. He submits that the same policy concerns for allowing additional time for a litigation guardian to be appointed and take over the management of the affairs of the incapable person apply to an estate trustee. He points out that it takes time for an estate trustee to review the affairs of the deceased, and to obtain probate.

The Court rejected this argument:

[6]         We are not persuaded the motion judge erred by dismissing the claim as statute barred. The grammatical and ordinary sense of the words of s. 7 are simply not elastic enough to apply to a deceased person and to construe an estate trustee to be a litigation guardian.

This is a very sensible response to a doubtful argument.  It’s plain that the Legislature didn’t intend that a “physical, mental or psychological condition” should be so broad as to encompass the condition of being dead.  Besides, it’s the Trustee Act that limits the pursuit of a deceased person’s claim.  The appellant didn’t rely on this provision, probably because it wouldn’t have helped, but it should be the starting point when considering the limitation of a deceased’s person claim.

Ontario: Court of Appeal on adding a party after the presumptive expiry of the limitation period

The Court of Appeal decision in Morrison v. Barzo sets out in detail the test for adding a party to a proceeding after the presumptive expiry of the limitation period.  It’s now the leading decision on the subject.

To obtain leave, the plaintiff must first rebut the presumption in s. 5(2) of the Limitations Act by leading evidence as to the date of subjective discovery.  The plaintiff doesn’t need to show evidence of due diligence; due diligence is immaterial to subjective discovery:

[31]      The evidentiary burden on a plaintiff seeking to add a defendant to an action after the apparent expiry of a limitation period is two-fold. First, the plaintiff must overcome the presumption in s. 5(2) that he or she knew of the matters referred to in s. 5(1)(a) on the day the act or omission on which the claim is based took place, by leading evidence as to the date the claim was actually discovered (which evidence can be tested and contradicted by the proposed defendant). The presumption is displaced by the court’s finding as to when the plaintiff subjectively knew he had a claim against the defendants: Mancinelli, at para. 18. To overcome the presumption, the plaintiff needs to prove only that the actual discovery of the claim was not on the date the events giving rise to the claim took place. It is therefore wrong to say that a plaintiff has an onus to show due diligence to rebut the presumption under s. 5(2): Fennell, at para. 26.

Second, the plaintiff must establish a prima facie discovery argument by leading evidence as to why the claim couldn’t have been discovered through reasonable diligence:

[32]      Second, the plaintiff must offer a “reasonable explanation on proper evidence” as to why the claim could not have been discovered through the exercise of reasonable diligence. The evidentiary threshold here is low, and the plaintiff’s explanation should be given a “generous reading”, and considered in the context of the claim: Mancinelli, at paras. 20 and 24.

This is not a due diligence analysis.  While a plaintiff’s due diligence is relevant to the finding under s. 5(1)(b), the absence of due diligence is a not a separate basis for dismissing a claim as statute-barred.  This is so whether the expiry of the limitation period is at issue in a motion for summary judgment or in a motion to add a defendant.

When a claimant ought reasonably to have discovered a claim requires an evidentiary foundation.  The court can’t say merely that the claim was discoverable before the expiry of the limitation period without explaining why.  It may be that the court can only determine when discovery ought to have occurred at a later stage of the proceeding.  In such a case, the motion to add the defendant should be granted, with leave for the defendant to plead a limitation defence:

[30]      Reasonable discoverability of a claim under s. 5(1)(b) that precludes adding a party contrary to s. 21(1) requires an evidentiary foundation. The court must be satisfied that a reasonable person in the plaintiff’s circumstances ought to have discovered the claim, and the date of such reasonable discovery must be determined. It is not sufficient for the court to say that the claim was discoverable “before the expiry of the limitation period”, without explaining why. It may be that the date of reasonable discoverability can only be determined at a later stage in the proceedings, at trial or on a summary judgment motion. In such a case, the motion to add the defendant should be granted, with leave for the defendant to plead a limitation defence: Mancinelli, at paras. 31 and 34.

Conceptually, I recognise the distinction between the court assessing the plaintiff’s due diligence in investigating the claim against the proposed defendant, and the court assessing whether the plaintiff could through reasonable diligence have discovered the claim against that defendant.  However, in practice, I suspect this is a distinction without a difference.  In both cases, the plaintiff will lead evidence of the steps taken to investigate the claim—due diligence—and argue that she did what was reasonable to investigate the claim and still didn’t discover it.  The proposed defendant will lead evidence of some other step the plaintiff could have taken and argue that it was a reasonable step and would have led to discovery.  And so the adequacy of due diligence is always in issue.

The Court also make important points about the findings that are necessary in a limitations analysis.  The court must identify the claims in question, and then find when they were discovered.  This requires a specific finding of fact that answers the question asked by s. 5(1)(b):

[60]      Instead, the motion judge was required, after clearly defining the nature of the claims against the respondents on the evidence, and after finding no actual knowledge of the claims, to make a specific finding of fact as to when a reasonable person “with the abilities and in the circumstances” of the appellants “first ought to have known of the matters referred to in clause (a)”.

Ontario: Court of Appeal on adverse possession and prescriptive easements

The Court of Appeal decision in Majewsky v. Veveris restates two real property principles:

  1. Adverse passion can be established with respect to lands registered under the Land Titles Act by possession meeting the necessary requirements during any continuous ten-year period prior to registration in Land Titles.
  2. To acquire a prescriptive easement whether under the doctrine of lost modern grant or by prescription under the RPLA, the claimant must demonstrate use that is continuous, uninterrupted, open, and peaceful for a period of 20 years.

Ontario: two notable misnomer decisions

Master Short’s decision in Frederica Mitchell v. John Doe is notable for its comprehensive summary of misnomer principles.

So too is Master Short’s decision in Livska v. Molina .  It’s an example of the circumstances where the court grants misnomer relief while granting leave to the correct party to plead a limitations defence.  Usually, misnomer relief means the correct party can’t plead a limitations defence because misnomer relief is a correction, not an addition or substitution (although the Court of Appeal is inconsistent on this point).  This means that the correct defendant was always a party to the proceeding, just misnamed, and if the proceeding was commenced in time, there can be no limitation defence for the correct defendant.

In Livska, the plaintiff named Molina, the alleged perpetrator of an assault, as a defendant.  Molina didn’t defend, and the plaintiff noted her in default.  Subsequently, the sister learned that Molina’s sister may have participated in the assault.   Master Short granted misnomer relief on the basis that Molina, correctly named, was in fact both herself and her sister.  Because Molina didn’t defend the action, whether the plaintiff’s proceeding was timely remained a live issue.

Ontario: the Court of Appeal on s. 36(8) of the Building Code Act

 

Nothern Bruce Peninsula (Municipality) v. Dolson considers the limitation period in s. 36(8) of the Building Code Act for proceedings under that Act.  I don’t think it’s technically a civil limitations issues, and I’ve never encountered it before.  Still, I’m all for completeness, so if you’re looking for a s. 36(8) authority, here you go.

Ontario: the limitation of will challenges

The decision in Shannon v. Hrabovsky follows Leibel for the principle that the Limitations Act applies to will challenges:

[63]           As I understand the analysis in Leibel v. Leibel, because a will is effective as of the date of death, section 5(2) creates a presumption that an applicant has knowledge of the contents of the will on such date. Given this presumption, an applicant with knowledge at the date of death of a will, and its contents, together with all other facts upon which a claim for lack of testamentary capacity would be based would therefore be fixed with all necessary knowledge as of that date.  In such circumstances, the date on which such a claim would have been discovered for the purposes of section 5(1)(a) would be the date of death. The same principle would appear to operate with respect to any claim for undue influence.

I’ve given this issue quite a lot of consideration in the course of drafting a paper on the limitation of will challenges.  In short, I don’t think that it does.  Statutory limitation periods have always applied to causes of action.  A will challenge is not a cause of action.  The Limitations Act applies to “claims”, not causes of action, but a “claim” is just a universalized cause of action that functions to simplify the accrual analysis and allow for a general basic and ultimate limitation period.  If there’s no cause of action, there’s no “claim”.  If there’s no “claim”, the Limitations Act doesn’t apply.  Let me if know you’d like a copy of the draft paper; I’m happy to provide it.

The quotation above illustrates the problem.  Section 5(2) creates a presumption that discovery occurs on the date of the “act or omission” giving rise to the claim.  No act or omission necessarily occurs on the date of death.  Indeed, there isn’t necessarily any act or omission at all in a will challenge.

The fundamental flaw in Leibel, and the jurisprudence that follows it, is to understand the Limitations Act as having expanded the scope of the statutory limitations scheme to include all court proceedings.  This is wrong: the Limitations Act only expanded the scope of the limitations scheme to include all causes of action (the old Act applied to a closed list of causes of action, excluding some, like certain equitable causes of action, that were limited only by equity).